Cancer cell plasticity represents the basis for cancer progression. Let’s think about the ability of cancer cells to grow within different niches: these cells are so adaptable that are able to grow in their original tissue, as well as in metastatic sites, even if histologically very different. Similarly, they can adapt to adverse stimuli, such as the attack launched by the immune system, or the anticancer therapies. Cancer stem cells represent the most relevant example of cancer cell plasticity. Their phenotype can be shaped depending on the surrounding microenvironment and, from an experimental point of view, depending on the experimental settings, and this could negatively affect both the biological and the pharmacological research. It is then crucial to catch the experimental conditions that better recapitulate the in vivo human situation. Our MIVO technology allows to recreate a microphysiological/micropathological system in a well, overcoming the limitations given by animal models and the more simplistic conventional in vitro conditions.

 "The picture shows the high variability in the expression of stemness markers within the same population of cancer cells (standard in vitro conditions)"

“The picture shows the high variability in the expression of stemness markers within the same population of cancer cells (standard in vitro conditions)”

If you are interested in the topic and want to deepen it, take advantage of the webinar that will take place on March 30th at 2:30 am. Our senior scientist Monica Marzagalli, author of this article, will present new insights into the use of the MIVO device to minimize cell culture-related bias, with a focus on cancer stem cells.

If you want more information and if you want to subscribe to the webinar visit our webinar page here: https://www.react4life.com/mivo-webinar/